Day 113: Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain

10 Sep

Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain

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Today, I want to feature my all-time favorite movie, Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain (2001) (known in America as Amélie).

As you guys probably know by now, I’m a movie fanatic. Normally, I would hesitate to name my favorite movies (since there are so many out there I love), but Amélie is by far the best movie I’ve ever seen.

The plot is incredibly unique: Amélie Poulain was born and raised by two strange parents. She was incredibly sheltered (due to a heart problem her father-doctor didn’t realize was fake), and grew up with her imagination as her best friend. Now, she is an adult living in Montmartre, working at a café called “Les 2 Moulins” (the two windmills). One night, she finds a small box containing childhood treasures of a man who used to live in her apartment. She decides that if finding this box changes this man’s life forever, she will become a full-time do-gooder. The movie embarks on her journey to change the lives of the people around her, while she attempts to change hers as well.

It’s glorious, beautifully filmed, and absolutely wonderful.

Here’s the preview with English subtitles:

BIG WARNING: While I advise everyone see this movie, it is rated R for a reason! There’s a few things here and there where it is explicit, but it’s done sparingly enough to make it a minor drift in the focus of the film. But once more: there are graphic scenes… so you’ve been forewarned!

Anyway, I adore this movie with a passion. All the characters and situations make it like a modern-day fairy tale, and Yann Tiersen’s score for the film is amazing.

But the best part of this film is it’s attention to detail. In fact, that’s the point of the film: everyone has something that makes them unique: Nino Quincampoix collects torn photobooth photos, and the glass man paints the same painting every year. It’s these things that the movie makes a point of mentioning, pointing out that no matter how strange you are or what you do there is hope for you in the future. In the cases of the people in this movie, hope is named Amélie.

I really admire this film, not only because of it’s strange filmmaking skills, but because it is exactly the way I want to see the world. I saw it when I was a kid (probably not the best idea the more I think about it…) and ever since I’ve been trying to improve the daily lives of those around me. I feel like if Amélie was real, she would be proud of me for this blog… at least I hope so!

Anyway, for the sake of everything, please check out Amélie… it is strange and wonderful and it never fails to make me fall in love with it again and again and again.

Here’s a scene that I adore:

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